All Parts Of A Peer-Reviewed Journal Have Been Peer-Reviewed Employee Engagement – Competence Trust and Confidence Trust – Why Leaders Need Both

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Employee Engagement – Competence Trust and Confidence Trust – Why Leaders Need Both

Pick up any business publication today and you’ll likely see at least one article on the topic of employee engagement. Employee engagement is the degree to which employees work with passion and feel a deep connection to their company. Gallup International recently reported that businesses in the top 24% for employee engagement had lower turnover and higher percentages of customer loyalty, profitability and revenue.

Employee engagement research continues to show that trust in the workplace is the foundation of employee engagement. If this is the case, it would be helpful if we could have a better idea of ​​what trust really is between employees and managers or organizations.

Nowadays, trust in an organization is a two-way street. Employees want to work for a manager and an organization they can trust, and managers want to trust their employees. The problem is that trust is a nebulous concept – no different from honesty, energy and commitment. We value these attributes in our employees and colleagues, but we don’t all agree on what they represent. Many of us say, “We’ll know it when we see it,” or “I’ll trust everyone until they prove me wrong.”

One useful way to define “trust” is to break it down into two types of trust: confidence trust and competence trust. “Trusting trust,” it says, is the belief that you can trust another person to do the right thing or to act in positive, ethical ways. On the other hand, “competence confidence” is the belief in a person’s ability to perform a job or complete a task. Competence confidence can be synonymous with a person’s ‘capabilities’. Confidence in self-confidence is synonymous with “doing the right thing of one’s will.”

Let’s look at some examples.

Phil has been a project manager for a financial institution for 10 years. He was a strong performer and has a reputation for hard work, excellent communication skills and a highly professional manner. When a recently hired VP was looking to add project managers to his team, he interviewed several candidates and chose Phil. Phil’s reputation preceded him and VP believed that Phil would continue to be a top performer. Phil did not disappoint, and at his annual performance review, the VP indicated that Phil had exceeded the standards for the position. He honored Phil both financially and with a nomination for the Leadership Team Award – a prestigious honor given annually to employees who exemplify the company’s core values. Phil enjoyed both the confidence and the new vice president’s willingness to believe in him, the “sight unseen,” and the competent confidence that he continued to demonstrate his abilities throughout the year.

Likewise, the VP enjoyed Phil’s trust—both in his competence as a manager, in setting expectations, holding employees accountable for results, measuring those results, and rewarding performance both financially and with significant recognition—and confidence that he could and would deliver. As advertised”.

In this example, the trust that each person showed the other was appropriate, and the end result was a win-win for both the employee and the manager.

However, this is often not the case. Consider what happened when Emily, a highly experienced researcher in the pharmaceutical industry, took on a new role at a company in her field. Although Emil continued to set high standards, his manager spent far more time with underperforming teammates. He said he needed to help these employees improve their performance and tried to provide in-depth coaching for each of them. When Emily asked her manager to provide feedback on a review of several papers she was writing, she agreed, but she was always busy or involved with her teammates when Emily asked her to review her work. In addition, her manager was either chronically late for team meetings she called, or skipped them altogether when something else came up. Although Emily had accepted her position, in part, because of her manager’s professional reputation, she was beginning to question whether he was truly up-to-date on the latest scientific research. When it came time for Emily’s annual performance review, Emily received very positive feedback on her performance and a very good salary increase. Her manager certainly had a competent confidence that Emily was showing strong abilities, and he acted as if he was sure she would continue to do so with little supervision. What he didn’t realize was that Emily’s trust in him—both in his managerial role and his concern for Emily and her work—was gone.

The employer/employee compact, which is so dependent on trust, will probably still hold true in Philly’s case. However, in Emily’s case, she may begin to question why she joined this company if she has little or no trust in her manager to provide what she needs to continue to be successful.

What can we learn from the situations involving Phil and Emily, and how can managers ensure that both types of trust are demonstrated by themselves and their employees?

Communication really is the key to rebuilding trust. As a manager, if you set specific, measurable expectations, provide both positive and corrective feedback, understand your employees’ goals and motivations, and recognize and reward top performers, you are well on your way to gaining or maintaining employee trust. A competent manager. It is especially important to remember to give feedback to great performers as well as those who are challenged. And, if you promise something to an employee – “Do what you say you will do.” This will earn you more respect than almost anything else you can do.

Employees will be much more inclined to be positive and energetic about their work if they have confidence in their managers. However, in this two-way street, employees must also ensure that they demonstrate their abilities, seek feedback, ask how they can help the company be even more successful, and help their managers understand what they need to succeed.

So as you think more about this elusive concept of “trust,” ask yourself, “How do you demonstrate both trust and competent trust with your employees? Now think about how your employees would answer these questions about themselves and you. Better yet, go ask them!

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